The Nerve Centre's Teaching Divided Histories project has produced a suite of new Key Stage 3 curriculum linked modules, including one on the Easter Rising.

Lessons in this module include 'Aims and Ideals of the Rebels', 'The Suppression and Impact of the Rising' and 'Women and the Rising'.

Funded by the European Regional Development Fund under the PEACE III programme, the project is led by the Nerve Centre in conjunction with the British Council, the Curriculum Development Unit of the City of Dublin Education and Training Board, CCEA and a range of other partners.

The aim of Teaching Divided Histories is to transfer knowledge and expertise between Northern Ireland and other conflict affected societies on how the delivery of education and learning can be developed to promote shared societies. 

Harnessing the potential of moving image and digital media, Teaching Divided Histories brings together post-primary teachers from across Northern Ireland and border counties to develop and pilot innovative education programmes using film, digital imagery, animation, comic books and webcasting to enable young people to explore common experiences of conflict and peace building.

Teachers and educators have been trained in a range of creative and critical skills to use moving image and digital technologies within the classroom to liberate and empower young people to engage practically with issues of conflict and division.

By drawing on best practice in the international field of conflict education through the networks of the British Council, the project is giving teachers the confidence, skills and specific resources and support that enables them to explore contentious history and identity in the classroom. 

Teaching Divided Histories is currently also working with teachers in Lebanon, India, South Africa and Sierra Leone, establishing partnerships with schools there and encouraging the digital sharing of creative responses to conflict education on an international basis.

Click here for more information on the Teaching Divided Histories project. 

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